The Microbiome

We have several microbiomes in the body, the skin, the eyes, the urinary tract and the gut. The gut is the biggest and the most important microbiome. The gut health determines the health of the human.

What is a microbiome? It is the ecosystem of the gut meaning all those microbes that live in a community and interact together in order to break down our food, regulate our hormones and our immune system, create vitamins in our body, alter our ph. It affects our inflammatory response and our ability to fight invaders.

Every microbiome is as unique as a fingerprint. We have good and bad microbes in the microbiome and we want them to be as diversified as possible so that they can cover every possible job that may come their way. When we have billions of differing microbes in our gut that are in perfect balance it keeps us free from pain and disease.

The human is made up of trillions of cells that are outnumbered ten to one by bacteria that cover our body both inside and outside, so we are more bacteria than we are human cells. If every bacteria has hundreds of genes then perhaps when we think about our genetic profile we should really be thinking about the genes of all those bacteria and consider how they might be affecting our everything and how in return we are affecting them.

Where does our microbiome come from? From the day we are born we get covered in the bacteria as we come down our mothers birth canal so the healthier she is the better for us. Babies born with a C section will have different microbe communities than a vaginal birth baby. As we grow and interact with different things we are getting more and varied microbes from everything we touch. A breast fed baby will have different microbes than a baby fed on formula. A fever or a course of anti-biotics will shift the microbiome sometimes with repercussion for decades or even a lifetime increasing likelihood of being atopic. (likelyhood of being allergic to something) Stress, injury and change in diet changes the biome. Pregnancy changes the flora of the canal getting ready for baby. Puberty, menopause change your microbiome and by the time you are 65 or older your number of microbes decrease and everybody’s microbes are very similar to each other. Gender, climate, occupation, cleanliness and diet all affect the biome and even our genes affect the microbiome population by changing the acidity of the gut. Fluoride and chlorine in the water change our microbiome. Processed foods, pesticides, agrochemicals GMO’s all affect our microbiome. Our body burden at birth will also affect our microbiome. Body burden is the chemicals, pesticides, GMO’s, heavy metals and all those things that we don’t want in our body that apparently amounts to about 200 plus different toxins at birth.

Can you see how when someone is described as a sickly baby or child how they have been set up to be so by the very “accidents” from conception onwards.

Leave a Reply